Amarillo Bay 
 Volume 18 Number 3 

Welcome to Amarillo Bay!

Something Good To Read
Volume 18 Number 2 — Published 16 May 2016

In addition to the works in this issue — the second issue of our eighteenth year — you can read the 755 works (269 fiction, 89 creative nonfiction, 397 poetry) we have published since 1999. See the Previous Works, including the ability to search through the issues.

Next Issue Delayed

Our publisher, who puts the works on the Web, had surgery on his hand two weeks ago. The healing process is going as expected, but not as quickly as hoped. Because of that, our next issue will not be published until Monday, 8 August, delayed from Monday, 1 August 2016. We appreciate your understanding.



Fiction Editor: Richard Moseley Richard Moseley

Richard Moseley is professor emeritus in English at West Texas A&M University who taught literary courses in modern short fiction, film and literature, Southwestern literature, and the contemporary American novel. His degrees are from the University of Texas at Austin (B.A.) and the University of Cincinnati (M.A. and Ph.D.).



Back to Zero
   by Britt Haraway Britt Haraway

Britt Haraway writes stories, some of which have appeared in the South Dakota Review, Natural Bridge, Moon City Review, Great Weather for Media, New Madrid, and BorderSenses. His poetry has also appeared in BorderSenses. He teaches creative writing at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and is the fiction editor for RiverSedge Magazine.

After a couple years together, I was surprised that Janet was still so interested in counting the freckles on my chest. She took off my glasses and smoothed my eyebrows down. I’d always wanted to grow those big Oppenheimer brows that reach out like insects. They probably gave him some extra information. I bet he knew when it would rain before the rest of us did.

“You need to pluck more,” she said. She got some tweezers from her bag and inspected.

“I want to look wise.” She yanked a group. “Ouch. I don’t like to do things that hurt, Janet.”

““Sure you do.” We’d just been biting each other’s thighs, finding that edge just before you say quit. “You do everything half-ass.” She took three more. Like a lot just out of college, Janet had put on the wall a poster of Albert Einstein sticking out his tongue. I thought people should put Oppenheimer up there, that physics ain’t about fun, that there is a moment of fear when we look at the reality we shape and say, the horror, I am become death.

I sucked in through clenched teeth. Janet was good with the tweezers and had this physical confidence. She took care of people going into and out of heart surgery. Was there in the room handing things to the doctor and suctioning things when they drained the blood to work on the heart. The key was to keep them cold enough, induce this hibernation. A doctor in Chicago, Daniel Hale Williams, did one of the first successful heart sew ups. He was one of the few black doctors who’d managed to get the right surgical training and a place to work. He fixed a guy who was stabbed in the heart. The guy all bleeding, Williams must have been willing to try anything, and two months later the knife guy was just walking around like the rest of us.   Continue…


The Day the War Was Almost Over
   by David Quinn David Quinn

David Quinn is an educator who lives with his wife in Macomb, Illinois. In addition to professional publications for his discipline (Spanish literature), he has published feature articles in The Philadelphia Bulletin and the San Francisco Chronicle. His short stories have appeared in Nocturne Horizons, The Fiction Primer, DownState Story, and Eureka Literary Magazine.

“Get into your pajamas,” Ma ordered, and it was just a little after four in the afternoon.

“Why?” I asked.

“Just do it,” her voice trembled. “Just do something for a change without always asking why. Will you just do that without fighting me all the time?”

I started up the back stairs from the kitchen to my bedroom and was about half way up when Ma offered an explanation: “Your father’ll be home any time now and he’s not going to like what I have to tell him.”

“What?” I hollered down the steps behind me.

“Just pretend you’re a little sick and maybe nothing’ll happen.”

“Yeah!” I mumbled to myself, getting to my room. Whenever Ma and Father started arguing, more often than not Father would take his anger out on me. So I was learning what to do: Play dumb. Hide what I’m thinking. Lie when I have to. Just like with Sister Celeste, Right? And then it hit me what all of this was about. The sealed report card I’d just brought home to be read and signed by my parents must have been bad. Real bad!

“She’s never liked me. Right from that first day,” I said aloud, flopping back on my bed.   Continue…


Devil’s Elbow, Kentucky: July 3, 1971
   by Mark Spencer Mark Spencer

Mark Spencer’s most recent novel is Ghost Walking. He is also the author of the novels The Masked Demon, The Weary Motel, and Love and Reruns in Adams County, as well as the nonfiction bestseller A Haunted Love Story: The Ghosts of the Allen House and the short story collections Wedlock and Trespassers. His work has received the Faulkner Society Faulkner Award for the Short Novel, the Omaha Prize for the Novel, the Bradshaw Book Award, the St. Andrews Press Short Fiction Prize, and four Special Mentions in Pushcart Prize: the Best of the Small Presses. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Arkansas at Monticello, where he is also the Dean of the School of Arts and Humanities.

His heart and head pounding, heat waves swimming up from the tarry asphalt, the boy ran up Devil’s Elbow Road to old man Lloyd’s Texaco station. Lloyd took his eyes off the numbers rolling on the gas pump just long enough to stab the boy with his mean-old-man eyes.

The boy was trembling. His lungs were on fire.

A stranger, a man in a black suit, was arguing with Lloyd.

“You can’t say that. You can’t say that, my friend!” This stranger was shaking his head and waving his arms. “You have misperceived me. I have dedicated my life to guiding my flock down the path of righteousness.”

Lloyd spit a brown puddle of tobacco juice onto the cracked asphalt, and in the blazing sun it turned to blood. “Path to your pockets, Preacher Man. You drivin’ a new Buick Riviera, for Christ’s sake. . . . Flock of chickens.”

“You surely believe in our Lord, my friend. None enter His kingdom but by His way. Surely, my friend, you know of The Way!”

The boy was working his mouth hopelessly, his throat raw and burning. His chest heaved. Sweat stung his eyes.   Continue…




Creative Nonfiction Editor: Gretchen Johnson Gretchen Johnson

Gretchen Johnson lives in Beaumont, Texas, and works as an Assistant Professor of English at Lamar University. Her short stories and poems have appeared in The Blue Bear Review, The Meridian Anthology of Contemporary Poetry, Poetry Harbor, Spout Press, The Sow’s Ear Poetry Review, and others. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing from Southwest Minnesota State University and her MFA in Creative Writing from Texas State University. Her first book, The Joy of Deception, was published by Lamar University Literary Press in 2012, and her second book; A Trip Through Downer, Minnesota, was published by Lamar University Literary Press in 2014.



The Last Chocolate Bar:
A Requiem For My Father

   by Rosalind Kaplan Rosalind Kaplan

Rosalind Kaplan is a physician. Her primary work has been in the genre of Narrative Medicine. Her work has appeared in Pulse Magazine, the Temple Medical School Alumni Magazine, the anthology Prompted (PS Books, Philadelphia, 2010), and will be in the upcoming anthology of Pulse Magazine essays. Her book, The Patient in the White Coat, was published by Kaplan Publishing (New York 2010). She now enjoys writing literary nonfiction.

1.

I don’t know much about being a New York City cab driver, but I imagine that one who’s been around a while has pretty much seen and heard it all. But maybe not this. Maybe not that I am careening up the West Side Highway in one New York City cab, my father in tow, headed for Columbia Presbyterian.

The cabbie is weaving in and out of traffic and accelerating through the yellow lights. My father’s eyes are feral, terrified, as he grips the vinyl strap hanging from the ceiling. He repeatedly yells out, “Son of a bitch! Son of a bitch! Son of a bitch!” I wonder if I should apologize to the driver, but he stares straight ahead as he maneuvers his deathtrap vehicle. Perhaps he doesn’t even hear the expletives, but I find that hard to believe. I decide to say nothing and try to soothe my dad, but he is beyond any reasoning. And besides, maybe we ARE going to die in this cab.   Continue…



Poetry Editor: Katherine Hoerth Katherine Hoerth

Katherine Hoerth is the author of a poetry collection, The Garden Uprooted (Slough Press, 2012). Her work has been included in journals such as Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, BorderSenses, and Front Porch. She teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Texas Pan American and serves as Assistant Poetry Editor of Fifth Wednesday Journal.



Awakening
   by Jules Gates Jules Gates

Jules Gates is an Associate Professor of English in the Department of English and Modern Languages at Angelo State University, where she is the director of the English Education program, and has worked with colleagues since 2002 on the annual ASU Writers Conference in Honor of Elmer Kelton, conducting the conference interview with Terrance Hayes in 2009, and chairing the conference for 2 years when Mary Karr (2010) and Art Spiegelman (2011) were the featured writers. She is the faculty sponsor of Oasis, ASU’s student art and literary magazine. Dr. Gates has published poetry in Amarillo Bay, Blue Bonnet Review, Carcinogenic Poetry, Concho River Review, Voices de la Luna, and Visions with Voices. She has presented poetry and creative nonfiction at the South Central Modern Language Association Conference, the Texas Association of Creative Writing Teachers Conference, and the Langdon Review Weekend.

Our May-December romance
got hit by a blizzard
and the lake where I drowned myself
froze with you in it   Continue…


Hallelujah
   by Laurence Musgrove Laurence Musgrove

Laurence Musgrove is professor of English at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, where he teaches creative writing, literature, and comics. A native Texan, his poetry collection Local Bird is from Lamar University Literary Press. His poems have also appeared in Concho River Review, Buddhist Poetry Review, Inside Higher Ed, Texas Poetry Calendar, Red River Review, San Antonio Express-News, and New Texas. He blogs at theillustratedprofessor.com and cartoons at texosophy.com.

Let’s not
Be fooled
By the voice
We hear
And think
It’s our own   Continue…


Homage to the Valley Palms
   by Carol Coffee Reposa Carol Coffee Reposa

The poems, reviews, and essays of Carol Coffee Reposa have appeared or are forthcoming in The Atlanta Review, The Evansville Review, The Texas Observer, Southwestern American Literature, The Valparaiso Review, and other journals and anthologies. Author of four books of poetry—At the Border: Winter Lights, The Green Room, Facts of Life, and Underground Musicians—Reposa was a finalist in The Malahat Review Long Poem Contest (1988), winner of the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center Poetry Contest (1992), and a winner of the San Antonio Public Library Arts & Letters Award (2015). She has received three Pushcart Prize nominations, along with three Fulbright-Hays Fellowships for study in Russia, Peru, Ecuador, and Mexico and twice has made the short list for Texas Poet Laureate. Named professor emerita of English at San Antonio College in 2010, she now serves as poetry editor of Voices de la Luna.

They sway
Along the Interstate
In their endless rumba,
Ten thousand showgirls
In outrageous hats,
Those bobbing green plumes.   Continue…


Restoration
   by Carol Coffee Reposa Carol Coffee Reposa

The poems, reviews, and essays of Carol Coffee Reposa have appeared or are forthcoming in The Atlanta Review, The Evansville Review, The Texas Observer, Southwestern American Literature, The Valparaiso Review, and other journals and anthologies. Author of four books of poetry—At the Border: Winter Lights, The Green Room, Facts of Life, and Underground Musicians—Reposa was a finalist in The Malahat Review Long Poem Contest (1988), winner of the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center Poetry Contest (1992), and a winner of the San Antonio Public Library Arts & Letters Award (2015). She has received three Pushcart Prize nominations, along with three Fulbright-Hays Fellowships for study in Russia, Peru, Ecuador, and Mexico and twice has made the short list for Texas Poet Laureate. Named professor emerita of English at San Antonio College in 2010, she now serves as poetry editor of Voices de la Luna.

I have taken on my patio wilderness,
Savage after ten years of neglect.
English ivy tangles power lines
And curls across windows
In an impromptu parade.
Japanese yews shoot
Above the roofline, split shingles,
While hackberries
Heavy with wasps’ nests
Spew their furious red fruit.   Continue…


Ode for a Karmann Ghia
   by David Thornbrugh David Thornbrugh

Until he was twenty-four, David Thornbrugh thought Emperor Penguins averaged six foot tall, thus enabling these royal birds to look human intruders in the eye. The resulting shame and embarrassment he felt at the mockery of his peers drove him into the arms of poetry, where he has felt only mildly aggrieved ever since. He thinks of himself as following in the tradition of Archie the Cockroach, whose best work resulted from throwing himself at the keys of a resistant machine, one bruise at a time.

He called his car the coffin,
which is how he drove it,
like a dead man looking for a grave.
Painted primer gray
in anticipation of the coming repairs.   Continue…


The Seashore
   by James G. Piatt James G. Piatt

James G. Piatt, a retired professor and octogenarian, lives near the ocean and woods, places that coax him into writing poems. He has had poems nominated for Pushcart and Best of Web awards, and published in The 100 Best Poems Anthologies. He has published 3 poetry books “The Silent Pond” (2012), “Ancient Rhythms,” (2014), and “LIGHT” (2016), and over 870 poems, in over 100 magazines, anthologies, and books. He earned his BS and MA from California Polytechnic University and his doctorate from BYU

I collect seashells like I
Collect old memories,
Listening to tales
Of lost ships and old
Friends that are gone:

I love the Conch’s texture, the
Feel of briny visions, and the
Coarse sand as it recites old
Stories to me as I walk upon it:   Continue…



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Works by Issue

Works are published the first Monday of February, the third Monday of May, the first Monday of August, and the first Monday of November.

2016, Volume 18 Number 4, 7 November 2016 — Future Issue
Number 3, 1 August 2016 — Future Issue
Number 2, 16 May 2016 — Current Issue
Number 1, 1 February 2016

2015, Volume 17 Number 4, 2 November 2015
Number 3, 10 August 2015
Number 2, 18 May 2015
Number 1, 2 February 2015
2014, Volume 16 Number 4, 3 November 2014
Number 3, 4 August 2014
Number 2, 19 May 2014
Number 1, 3 February 2014
2013, Volume 15 Number 4, 4 November 2013
Number 3, 5 August 2013
Number 2, 20 May 2013
Number 1, 4 February 2013
2012, Volume 14 Number 4, 5 November 2012
Number 3, 6 August 2012
Number 2, 21 May 2012
Number 1, 6 February 2012
2011, Volume 13 Number 4, 7 November 2011
Number 3, 1 August 2011
Number 2, 16 May 2011
Number 1, 7 February 2011
2010, Volume 12 Number 4, 1 November 2010
Number 3, 2 August 2010
Number 2, 17 May 2010
Number 1, 1 February 2010
2009, Volume 11 Number 4, 2 November 2009
Number 3, 3 August 2009
Number 2, 18 May 2009
Number 1, 2 February 2009
2008, Volume 10 Number 4, 3 November 2008
Number 3, 18 August 2008
Number 2, 19 May 2008
Number 1, 11 February 2008
2007, Volume 9 Number 4, 12 November 2007
Number 3, 6 August 2007
Number 2, 7 May 2007
Number 1, 5 February 2007
2006, Volume 8 Number 4, 6 November 2006
Number 3, 7 August 2006
Number 2, 8 May 2006
Number 1, 6 February 2006
2005, Volume 7 Number 4, 7 November 2005
Number 3, 8 August 2005
Number 2, 2 May 2005
Number 1, 7 February 2005
2004, Volume 6 Number 4, 1 October 2004
Number 3, 2 August 2004
Number 2, 3 May 2004
Number 1, 2 February 2004
2003, Volume 5 Number 4, 3 November 2003
Number 3, 4 August 2003
Number 2, 5 April 2003
Number 1, 3 February 2003
2002, Volume 4 Number 4, 4 November 2002
Number 3, 5 August, 2002
Number 2, 6 May 2002
Number 1, 4 February 2002
2001, Volume 3 Number 4, 5 November 2001
Number 3, 6 August 2001
Number 2, 7 May 2001
Number 1, 5 February 2001
2000, Volume 2 Number 4, 6 November 2000
Number 3, 7 August 2000
Number 2, 1 May 2000
Number 1, 7 February 2000
1999, Volume 1 Number 3, 1 November 1999
Number 2, 2 August 1999
Number 1, 3 May 1999